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Julie Krzykwa, PhD student in the Jeffries lab, publishes research aimed at identifying endpoints indicative of neurotoxicity in fish embryos.

Julie Krzykwa, PhD student in the Jeffries lab, publishes research aimed at identifying endpoints indicative of neurotoxicity in fish embryos. Julie Krzykwa (MS Biology 2017, PhD Biology 2020), Asal Saied (BS Biochemistry 2020) and Dr. Marlo Jeffries (Associate Professor of Biology) published an article in Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety entitled “Identifying sublethal endpoints for evaluating neurotoxic compounds utilizing the fish embryo toxicity test” (Vol. 170, pg. 521-529). The article presents the results of experiments, conducted as part of Julie’s MS thesis project, aimed at advancing the fish embryo toxicity (FET) test, which is considered a more humane alternative to toxicity tests that utilize older fish. Julie’s research confirms that fish embryos are less sensitive to some neurotoxic compounds than older fish, but also demonstrates that the inclusion of sublethal endpoints (including eye size and pericardial edema) can enhance FET test performance in some cases. Ultimately, Julie’s results can be utilized to improve existing FET test procedures, making it more robust and applicable alternative toxicity testing strategy. The article can be viewed here.

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